Friday, 20 February 2009

Blog Interview: In a Bind Design

Name:
Rachel Friedman

Company/Etsy Site:
Inabinddesign (http://inabinddesign.etsy.com)

Website:
n/a at the moment

Blog:
n/a at the moment

Location:
Brooklyn, NY

How long has your Etsy shop been open?
It's been about 2.5 years.

How did you get into crafting?
I've always dabbled in it, but became serious about book binding during college, when I took an introduction to book arts course.

How did Etsy come into your life?
Etsy was mentioned to me casually by a friend who was also into book binding. We actually learned how to make books together.


What was your involvement in the crafting world before stumbling upon Etsy?
I made art on my own, and tried to get into small art fairs in the town where I grew up, in Connecticut. I was selling to friends and family, though I sold more photography than books.

Do you have a day job?
I am a preschool teacher, currently working with 3 year olds. I also go to graduate school for early childhood education--but I consider that my night job!

Tell us about your shop:
Does anyone help you? I'm in it by myself, though I get a lot of encouragement from family and friends.

What advice would you give to newbies on Etsy or in the crafting world?
Never give up on your art! It may seem like no one is really paying attention, but they are. It just takes a while to get noticed. But there are certainly ways in which you can generate more interest. Making treasuries and joining groups helps you become acquainted with members a lot faster, and makes the etsy experience a lot more satisfying.

What's the most challenging part of your crafting?
For me, the most challenging part is the gluing. I love stitching the book blocks together, I love gathering all of the beautiful decorative papers for the covers, and I even enjoy cutting the book board. I could definitely do without getting the glue all over my fingers.

Do you show your work locally?
Not at the moment, but after grad school I would love to focus on getting my art shown in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and at a few of the fairs they hold in different parts of Brooklyn.

Famous last words?
"I'll bind this stack of books in one weekend."

How did you get interested in bookmaking?
At first, my friend Laura (CloverGrove) started binding. We'd work together every Thursday night trying out another binding technique from one of the beginner books that we had found. I fell in love. I started taking artist book courses and expanding my knowledge. I also started papermaking around the same time, so I felt I was really putting all of the pieces together.

How long have you been crafting? Bookmaking?
I have been crafting since early childhood. I have been bookmaking for approximately four years.



What is your favorite stitch/technique?
I really enjoy the basic codex, with a cloth spine.

What is the one tool or supply that you couldn't live without?
My bonefolder. I use it for just about everything.

Materials you use for your books?
handmade and store bought papers, davey board, irish linen thread, a variety of book block paper, ribbons & love.

What inspires you?
Children, and the beautiful world around me. I like to look around things, or in between objects. The little spaces unnoticed by others are where my interests lie.

Who is your crafting hero?
My best friend, and book binding buddy, Laura Kang (http://clovergrove.etsy.com)

Guilty pleasure?
The Sims 2 ... which is why I've been slacking on books lately . . . hehe.

Sunday, 15 February 2009

An Abecedarian of BEST members: D

Today’s letter is “D”: delve into the diverse and delightful demographic of designers whose shops display the letter D.

Danielle of Dameling Handmade Books and Prints from Des Moines has defined this dashing journal with a darling diamond decoration:



Drop in to Deckled Edge Bindery where Jennifer has a “Designer” division in her shop with this distinguished and detailed desirable double book:



Nikki of Deconstructed Artichoke Press demonstrates deftness with design and dramatic documents with Disconnected Constellations--Original Artists Book:



Donnalda of Donnalda Smolens Fine Art defines her work from the desert. Use this journal to document your dash to the desert:



DragonflyCrafts defends the delectable pea pod with this delicious journal:



Drunken Bumblebee deploys daring material decisions in her Tiny triple accordion book:

Wednesday, 11 February 2009

Box Making Tutorials

Box making goes hand-in-hand with bookbinding. Really, a book in its own box is an incredibly satisfying thing. Is there anything better? Maybe a box that is also a book? or a book that turns into a box? Leave a comment for us if you know of other great box making resources, practical or not...

Online

PDF: Clamshell Box
www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/publications/documents/mg6a.pdf

PDF: Drop Spine Box
library.syr.edu/information/spcollections/conservation/SUConsManual-DropSpineBox.pdf

PDF: Phase Box
library.syr.edu/information/spcollections/conservation/SUConsManual-PhaseBox.pdf

PDF: Folded Magic Box
www.philobiblon.com/gbwarticle/hutchins2.PDF

PDF: Portfolio
www.philobiblon.com/PortfolioWithSoftFlaps.pdf

Website: Origami Box
www.kid-at-art.com/htdoc/lesson16.html

Website: Photo Gallery of steps to making a book box
www.bookbinding.net/gallery/

Website: Slipcase
cool-palimpsest.stanford.edu/byorg/abbey/an/an13/an13-5/an13-518.html

Video: Origami Box
www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdPkgqV_OiU

Video: Origami Moving Cubes
www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMkOOi-SU_M

Video: Boxes for Books
www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvKeEtBCxMg


Books

Japanese Bookbinding by Kojiro Ikegami
Includes Japanese boxes and wrap-around case structures

Creating Handmade Books by Alisa Golden
Includes slipcases, portfolio, clamshell box, and 2-piece box constructions

Creative Bookbinding by Pauline Johnson
Includes file boxes and letter boxes

Creating Books and Boxes by Benjamin D Rinehart
Includes boxes with dividers, triangular and circular boxes

Books, Boxes, and Portfolios by Franz Zeier
Includes box with cover, box with hinged lid, round boxes, and several portfolio constructions

Books, Boxes and Wraps by Marilyn Webberly & JoAn Forsyth
Includes several box and portfolio structures

Friday, 6 February 2009

Blog Interview: The Guilded Quill

Name:
Ammie Hague (known to some faeries as Apple Leigh)

Company/Etsy Site:
The Gilded Quill / www.gildedquill.etsy.com

Website:
www.gildedquill.net

Blog:
Apple, on Tribe.net: people.tribe.net/5c1e42b5-70f3-446b-8bd6-f3313561915f

Location:
Shoreline, WA

How long has your Etsy shop been open?
April 6, 2008

How did you get into crafting?
It has been an evolution of skills throughout my life but I prefer being able to see the fruits of my labor as opposed to shuffling virtual paper.

How did Etsy come into your life?
Deadlocks for my hair, of course! I was vending at Faerieworlds, searching for some fairy hair to complete my costume and found the etsy seller cleowolfus, poked my nose around etsy a bit and voila!

What was your involvement in the crafting world before stumbling upon Etsy?
I've had my business for a few years now and just added etsy this last year. My main audience until etsy was the convention and faire circuit as well as my own website.

Do you have a day job?
I did have a day job working at WaMu. With the JPMorgan Chase buyout, I've been either a victim or a fortunate to be laid off, depending on perspective. Strangely, this is the second time it has happened to me under almost exactly the same circumstances (just two different companies), so I am choosing to take the cosmic clue-by-four!


Tell us about your shop:
Does anyone help you? I have one partner who does the actual wood turning for the magic wands (who shall remain un-named by request) and another named Kat Hardy who is the sculptor for the fantasy wands in several of my Spellbook sets.
We often discuss ideas, themes and designs, etc. but outside of the wand shop, everything else about my shop is put together by myself. I do all of the customer interface, graphic design, bookbinding, quill making, etc.

What advice would you give to newbies on Etsy or in the crafting world?
This could be an expansive list so I'll try to keep it short.
1) Get a Banner. Shops look bare and half-hearted without it.
2) Be Verbose and Tidy. Customers like to learn about what they're buying, describe! Also, don't forget to do so using proper grammar and spelling, it is so unprofessional to use 'text-write'. As the saying goes: "If you say "plz" because it's shorter than "please", I'll say "no" because it's shorter than "yes".
3) Sign your emails and messages! There is nothing so frustrating as trying to speak to a vendor via email and not knowing who to address.
4) Strike a Pose and Vogue! Pictures are very important since your customers cannot touch the product, try to use as many of the slots as possible, rotate your product around for them

What's the most challenging part of your crafting?
I once read a quote: "We don't pay artists for their craft, we pay them for their ideas."
Indeed, ideas are the most difficult aspect of crafting for me – I could have all the knowledge and talent in the world but if I cannot imagine what to do with it, I'm dead in the water.

Do you show your work locally?
I travel and vend at conventions and faires such as Norwescon, Radcon, Orycon, Faerieworlds, Spring Fairy Festival, etc. I also have some of my work in various shops.

Famous last words?
“Impossible is nothing."

How did you get interested in bookmaking?
One night, while my roommate was cooking toxic materials in the oven in order to create a statue of Cthulhu, I was bored and wanted to make something also. So I found the only book in my collection that I could bear to destroy (it was on the Clinton Administration and I wasn't even sure that it was originally mine!), and set about tearing it apart, studying the binding, and then trying to recreate it by making a book. It snowballed from there.

How long have you been crafting? Bookmaking?
I have been making books since I was a very little girl, though at the time I couldn't have ever predicted it would become this! It all started with the Fattie Books, which were little stories that I drew and wrote on notebook paper, then glued and stapled together. I had a whole series. Then in 7th grade, I made a ribbon bound book on the daily life of the Aztecs for a report project…I guess I just never quite got over it!

What is your favorite stitch/technique?
My personal preference is a fully enclosed spine with a codex binding.

What is the one tool or supply that you couldn't live without?
"A" is for Ammie who can't live without an Awl.


Materials you use for your books?
Since I do not make books in a cookie-cutter technique or fashion, the materials I have been known from books is extensive. Some of the more interesting ingredients have been: animal skulls, spring water from the Temple of the Sun at Machu Picchu, antique broaches, photo of Esmerelda's room at Notre Dame http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php?listing_id=18326975 , hourglass, teabags, wire screen, medical scissors.

What inspires you?
I love knowledge and word-smithing. The prospect of creating the tomes which will transform ephemeral thought into tangible ideas on a page is fantastic!

Who is your crafting hero?
I would do an injustice to everyone else who ever inspired me, taught me or otherwise supported and assisted me if I named only one person.

Guilty pleasure?
I think of it as "Sunday" (even if it isn't), most would call it whiling away the time of day. There's nothing I love more than spending a whole lovely day, daydreaming, reading, drinking a tasty beverage, and following my whims!

Wednesday, 4 February 2009

Longstitch Binding Tutorials

Longstitch bindings come in many forms and answer to many names; there are probably a million ways to make books using longstitch sewings. That might not even be an exaggeration. I've compiled a list of resources for anyone who might be interested in learning more about longstitch bindings where the textblock is sewn directly through the cover material. Leave a comment if you have other favorite longstitch resources either online or in print.

Online

Longstitch binding Video:
Part One www.youtube.com/watch?v=LVkO6dyOBtg
Part Two www.youtube.com/watch?v=trSQuwCVYMM&NR=1

Website: Make your Own Journal
www.teeshamoore.com/how_to_make_journals.htm

Website: How to Make a Simple Sketchbook
www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Sketchbook

Website: Longstitch
en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Bookbinding/Long_stitch

Website: Slotted Spine Longstitch
myweb.westnet.com.au/ajbanks/Tutorials/Slotspine/slsptut01.htm

Website: Longstitch Binding
(by BEST member ComfortableShoes)
Part One
comfortableshoesstudio.blogspot.com/2005/07/long-st...part-1.html
Part Two
comfortableshoesstudio.blogspot.com/2005/07/long-st...part-2.html

Books

Creating Handmade Books (p.91-93)
by Alisa Golden

Non-Adhesive Binding: Books without Paste or Glue, Vol 1 (p.141-177)
by Keith Smith

Sunday, 1 February 2009

An Abecedarian of BEST members: C

Today’s letter is “C”: Cheers for our community of compelling creators commencing with C.

Wendy, of the company Cathartic Slant, enjoys constructing and collaging with paper. Her Mini Book in Red uses credit cards, Canson & cream papers:



Chiara of CelesteFrittata has caught the contagious craze of Harry Potter with her Care of Magical Creatures notebook:



At Cliff Landis Creative Arts shop you’ll find a cute coptic candy corn journal, sure to commence conversation.



Leslie of Comfortable Shoes Studio has a consequential Sewing Cradle that every bookbinder could crave:




At Conduit Press, Talia has created this Chandelier Album with contrast and charm: